Komputer Korner – December 2007

Some useful information which I have picked up recently:

  • If you use Parallels on an Intel Mac – and you really should – you can add a shared folder /Volumes and you will get a mapped drive holding all your mounted OSX volumes automatically, including dmg, sparse images, ssh volumes etc. For me this means that I can now see the file system on my iPod in WindowsXP even while it is connected and being synced in MacOSX. /Volumes is hidden in the Finder but you can type the name manually when adding a new shared folder in Parallels (and you don’t even have to close or restart Parallels)
  • The entire suite of fantastically useful/powerful SysInternals tools for Windows are available as a single package from Microsoft. If you have to deal with Windows at an even vaguely technical level, you really should be using these tools, especially ProcessExplorer and ProcessMonitor.
  • Safari has tabbed browsing, but it is turned off by default. How did I miss this? That’s the only reason I installed Firefox on MacOSX.
  • http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?cht=p3&chd=s:BCE&chs=200x80&chl=A|B|CGoogle has created the Google Chart API, which means you can get a nice simple chart rendering just by specifying the data in the URI. This means that people can stop writing their own crappy Sparkline implementations!
  • Super Remove Dead Tracks v2.0 is an AppleScript to scan your iTunes library and remove tracks that no longer exist on your hard drive. Why Apple neglected to include this UNBELIEVABLY OBVIOUS AND NECESSARY funtionality from iTunes I have no idea. Turns out about 20% of my library was missing, largely because of removed dupes, and now when I update my iPod it actually copies the tracks I expect.
  • If you have a MacBook then for God’s sake get 2GB of RAM and get it now! (not from Apple though, they will totally screw you on price) Since upgrading I notice the icons in the dock bounce just once now instead of three times when I start applications. It sucks that an OS should need more than a gigabyte just to run smoothly, but that’s just how it is these days. Except for Linux of course, but I’m not going there any time soon.

2 Responses:

  1. Ross says:

    I got ProcessExplorer last week to find out what process was locking a file. It turned out to be Copernic DesktopSearch, which has never done that to me before.

  2. mark says:

    ProcessMonitor came to the rescue for us recently to reveal the cause of a failure somewhere within a 3rd party library… once we were able to identify the nature of the failure we created a workaround for it.